PLANETARIAN or
ENVIRONMENTAL ARTWORK
Part 3 - Pottery shards

Copyright © 2011, 2012 by Craig Carlton Dremann, both text and images.

P.O. Box 361, Redwood City, CA 94064 - (650) 325-7333 - email

Part 1 is at http://www.ecoseeds.com/art.html

Part 2 is at http://www.ecoseeds.com/art2.html

Earthrise
Digital image of moon and Earth from NASA, with new text by Craig Dremann.
Title: "Be careful, this is the only home you have."

PLANETARIAN ARTWORK is a new form of artistic expression, where the image tells a story about local natural ecosystems or the planetary environment, and the title of the image explains that story in depth, as shown below. These stories are to express the concept of "Whole Planet Awareness" or in the French language, "Conscience Planète Entière."


Arastradero preserve

Title: "FIRST TIME IN OVER 200 YEARS, someone is replanting the local native plants on this site, after the site got overwhelmed by European annual and perennial weed grasses and Italian thistles, and this site is located above the parking lot at the Arastradero Preserve, Palo Alto, California in summer 2012 you see a person cutting the weed grasses and using their stalks as mulch to be used to smother the weed grass seedlings as they germinate in winter."

Acrylics on canvas, 6" x 12" Painting #41 in catalogue. Painting #41 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2012 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.




Arabia vase

Title: "WHEN RIVERS FLOW AGAIN in Arabia, a vase to dip into that lovely, life-giving water that has been missed for 5,500 years."

Cermaic vase, 5" x 8" artifact #42 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2012 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.



Arastradero preserve

Title: "FIRST TIME IN OVER 200 YEARS, someone is replanting the local native grasses and wildflowers on a hillside in Palo Alto, but first everything that looks green in this painting has to be managed--because all the green in this field are European weed grass and European thistle seedlings germinating--and it is also necessary to manage the weed seedlings coming up in the gray areas--last year's Italian thistle dried stalks--and the weed seedlings are eliminated using straw mulch that was laid down earlier in the summer, and native plant seedlings being planted while the rainbow was overhead the afternoon of December 21, 2012."

Acrylics on canvas, 6" x 12" Painting #43 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2012 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Haiti peppers

Title: "The STORY told by the PEPPER LEAVES in Haiti, the Scotch Bonnet pepper plant known asCapsicum chinense, developed by the ancestors of the Tainos Native Americans, along with corn, beans, and squashes, and these crops are the last evidence that Haiti was home to those exterminated people for at least 1,500 years, and the pepper leaves are talking to us today, and telling about the past and also forecasting the future of the people in Haiti,

and the pepper leaves are telling a story that for last 200 years, the people forgot to fertilize the farm fields, so that each time a crop was harvested, a little bit of calcium was removed, so that after 200 years the calcium level is now close to zero, and what happens to farmland when it runs out of calcium, is that it stops growing and producing crops,

so that currently there is only enough calcium left for another 10-20 years worth of crops, and after that time, without fertilizers added the island will have to be abandoned because crops will not be able to grow and that is why the painting shows a sunset off the coast of Haiti, that without adding limestone to the fields, crop production will end very soon,

However, there is an easy fix to this lack of calcium that the pepper leaves are telling us about, that there are deposits of limestone in Haiti and when the pepper leaves are flat, then there is adequate calcium to grow crops, but if the leaves wrinkle, then limestone must be added until the leaves flatten out again,

and the two Haitian butterflies in the painting, the Scarce Haitian Swallowtail (Papilio aristor), a Threatened Species whose larvae feed on citrus and the Southern Dogface (Zerene cesonia) whose caterpillar food plants are plants in the bean family,

these butterflies represent Papa Loko, who is the Haitian spirit of vegetation and gives healing or medicinal properties to leaves, and the pepper leaves will be able to diagnose and help cure the calcium poverty in the farmlands, to help the Haitian people continue to grow their crops."

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #44 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2012 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Haiti corn

Title: "THE CORN LEAVES' GIFT TO THE FARMERS of Haiti and the World, by reading the colors of the leaves, farmers will be able to know when key soil nutrients are low, and by adding the proper fertilizers, the corn indicates adequate supplies by turning green, and this painting is taken from photos from Howard B. Sprague's book Hunger Signs in Crops, from the third edition, pages 48-49, and the two newly discovered Haitian moths are the corn spirits flying over the crop with the crescent moon, are watching over the corn crop on the island, and they are the Eremonidia mirifica and the Caribojosia youngi, and they are hoping the farmers will notice that the red in the leaves or corn stem means a phosphorus deficiency exists, and the tan edge of the leaves with the yellow means potassium is lacking, and the yellow in the older leaves, means that nitrogen is needed immediately."

Acrylics and pen on canvas, 10" x 10" Painting #45 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Arastradero poppies

Title: "WILDFLOWERS BLOOMING after a 200-year absence from a Palo Alto, California hillside, where one thousand California poppy seedlings were planted, and 2,000 and 2,500 blooms produce the protein-rich pollen needed by the native bumblebees--and the people may look at this planting as a nice visual addition to the preserve, but to each bumblebee it is a life or death matter--and by removing 99.997% of the weeds, had allowed the 200 year old dormant native seeds that have been asleep in the soil to sprout, since their germination was no longer suppressed by allelochemicals produced by the weeds, frees the tarweeds from bondage and they are able to spout and grow while their two-century old seeds are still viable."

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #46 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Oak tree

Title: "AT FIRST GLANCE THIS PICTURE LOOKS NORMAL, and this is what one would see when driving along the roads of the foothills of California and it all looks perfectly normal--except it is showing the final chapter in the extinction of the native grassland-wildflower field-oak woodland ecosystem in less than 250 years, which started with the introduction of the non-native sheep and cattle, and in 1851, 1852 and 1857 the California legislature approved Acts along with the US Congress to subsidize the extermination of the California Indians managing the oak trees as their food crops for centuries and living on those lands, and then the extinction of the top carnivores, the California Grizzly bear, a subspecies weighing up to 2,200 pounds became extinct in August 1922 in Tulare County at Horse Corral Meadows and the last wolf killed in Tule Lake in 1924, and then the barbed wire fencing put up starting in the 1870s and then increasing the non-native grazing animal biomass so it was equal to the humans biomass, and the development of well water supplies, and then the movement of the grazing animals around the state to graze different areas by railroads and later by trucks, and not lowering the animals on the grasslands during the massive two-year drought of 1863-5-- all of these features contributed to close to 100% spatial extinction of the wildflower fields and native grasslands that John Muir wrote about in the last chapter of his book 'The Mountains of California', and today the last oak trees are surrounded by annual weeds from Europe instead of the wildflowers, and this tree pictured here is one of the 500 trees left on 300 acres in San Joaquin County at Lat. 38.18 North and Long. 121.05 at 1,167 feet elevation, south of the town of Clements established in 1882, east of Clements Road, near the junction of State Rt. 12 and Rt. 88, and the old oaks are spaced 50-300 feet apart and are all of the same age, and you do not see any oak seedlings or younger trees around them, and the acorns from these oaks were the main food crop of the California Indians for centuries, so today we see aged isolated individuals surrounded by weeds with non-native grazing animals eating their seedlings, the largest hardwood in North America, the Valley Oak, that only exists in California, that has existed for 40 million years, and unless the oak woodlands are allowed to reproduce, by eliminating the non-native grazing animals and restore the wildflower and native grassland under story, this generation will be the last, by CE year 2200."

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #47 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Monsoon battle

Title: "5,000 YEAR OLD ANNUAL BATTLE between the Pakistan-Arabia man-made Dust Cloud and the Indonesia-India summer monsoon moisture trying to move westward to bring rain to western India, Pakistan, Arabia, the Horn of Africa, across Africa, across the Atlantic to bring summer rains to the crops of North America--the Dust Cloud is formed by the domesticated grazing animals of the region eating the wildlands vegetation to ground level, creating a massive Dust Bowl-like situation, where the soil is picked up by the leading edge of the monsoon winds, and becomes airborne, and the unirrigated dryland farming, that plows the land instead of using no-till methods, also helps form the Dust Cloud--the Dust Cloud traps the heat in the air and also dissipates cloud formation and changes the dew point so clouds cannot form, so a battle forms every summer--so as long as the Dust Cloud hovers over a country like Pakistan or Arabia, drought occurs along with oppressive heat and humidity and at the same time forms a barrier which can stall the monsoon movement and cause massive floods in India, Pakistan or Arabia, and it is the most powerful weather changer on the planet, able to stop Category 5 cyclones in their track, like GONU, and this image shows the battle taken by RAMMB or the Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch of NOAA/NESDIS at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado and this was a CIRA Tropical Cyclone IR Image of the battle as it appeared on June 5, 2013."

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #48 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Mars on Earth

Title: "WATERLESS MARS-LIKE HELL getting started on Earth, where Mars used to have flowing water but now there are only dry river beds on that planet, and now we are creating those conditions on Earth when we allow our domesticated grazing animals to eradicate the native vegetation and this painting is from Jordan at exactly 32 N 38 E which is in the middle of a dry lake bed about 500 feet across and originally the water around 20 feet deep in a lava bed about 50 miles by 50 miles, and within that flow there are about 1,000 dry lakes and dry river beds peppered throughout the area, and if the barren desert to the east was revegetated, then the lakes would refill and the rivers flow again."

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #49 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Title: Painting in progress

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #50 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Title: Painting in progress

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #51 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Title: Painting in progress

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #52 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Title: Painting in progress

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #53 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Title: Painting in progress

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #54 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.


Title: Painting in progress

Acrylics on canvas, 8" x 10" Painting #55 in catalogue. Copyright image and text © 2013 by Craig Carlton Dremann, all right reserved.



PART ONE of Planetarian artwork, http://www.ecoseeds.com/art.html

MORE ARTWORK, ceramics at http://www.ecoseeds.com/sacred.html

WILDFLOWER photography at http://www.ecoseeds.com/wild.html

HAIKU of native plants at http://www.ecoseeds.com/haiku.html

VEGETATION MEGATRANSECT at http://www.ecoseeds.com/megatransect.html


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Updated August 23, 2013